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No Bureau cards, please!

They trashing my
incoming QSL!

   

A common modern and very stupid practice is to use THX or THNX abbreviations as an expression of thanks. These two „new form“ abbreviations came from internet but our new radio brethren transferred them onto radio waves. It is unchangeable sign that the user of such junky abbreviations is a NO-CODER. A thinking skilled ham can easily compare the sound of TNX and THX (or even worse THNX) on CW, unskilled “wannabe” ham radio newbie not. There is no apology regardless of the fact that these creatures can be seen almost exclusively on the cluster, in discussions and on the keyboard “macromodes”. So, please note that TNX or TKS are ham radio abbreviations, having their distinctive meaning and sound on the CW mode. THX or THNX are internet abbreviations, hardly acceptable among hams. Note also that there is nothing bad if you use TNX or TKS in internet discussions, emails etc.

EUCW LogoAbout Snakes and Ladders

This activity is being introduced into the EuCW calendar for 2014. It will begin on 1. April 2014 and run through until 31. March 2015. The goal of this activity is to promote the use of CW on the CW-portions of the amateur radio bands, and above all to stimulate operators to establish contacts with counterparts equally divided over Europe. Points may be earned by participants based on locator squares, reflecting their efforts to spread their CW activity over Europe.

[DXNL 1821 - February 27th, 2013]: Changes in the USKA QSL bureau:
QSL cards for non-members of the Swiss IARU society USKA will no longer be returned with a "Not Member" stamp, but silently discarded, to save work and money.

What a shame! This is known problem for many years: the QSL Bureau is roughly abused by a national Ham Radio Society (mostly IARU member) to force hams in the country to join. On the other hand, the Ham radio society officers whining about declining ham-spirit and operating skils. Isn't something rotten there with the IARU and ham radio generally? Why a QSL Bureau can't serve at non-profit basis for an acceptably small fee to ALL HAMS IN THE COUNTRY, regardless of membership?

A particular ham may have a half dozen of reasons to NOT be A MEMBER of the local Ham Radio Society but such ham is excluded from the common QSL exchange. This is an usual practice in many countries for years.

Anyway, my QSL card is MY PROPERTY until delivery to the recipient. I pay for a QSL card (printing, labels, my postal or QSL Bureau expenses etc.) in good belief that it will be delivered to the recipient. The Ham Radio Society decides to silently discard my property without informing me about my waste money.

How much QSL cards discarded do I need to initiate a lawsuit to get a compensation? Where should I get a proof that they actually made such nasty act?

WE NEED A CHANGE!

It is an UDP server allowing operation of the Winkey USB by K1EL with any Linux program with UDP keyer capability. It works in the same way as the popular cwdaemon. With Winkeyer USB server expands the useability of this excellent product to all Linux program with UDP keyer capability (TLF by PA0R etc.).

Downloads:

winkeyer_server_0.4.0 (32bit)

winkeyer_server_0.4.0 (64bit)

Just for the case of problems with your current distribution, the older version may work for you.

winkeyer_server_0.3.0

winkeyer_server_0.2.0

The CW Operators' Club announces its CW Academy, a program aimed at increasing the fun of using CW in the world of Ham Radio. The program addresses all levels of enthusiasts; from those aspiring to become licensed operators with a desire to learn Morse Code, all the way to veteran operators wanting to increase their CW activity, skills, and code speed.

Those wishing to participate will register here. A CWops member/advisor will be assigned to each registrant as a mentor and on-air contact.  We will use "sub-bands" similar to the Novice bands of yesteryear for all Academy students, CWops advisors, and CWops members to communicate with one another worldwide (e.g. 3.550-3.570, 7.050-7.070, 14.050-14.070, 21.050-21.070 and 28.050-28.070).

So, if you've always wanted to join the fun of using Morse Code over the air, or want to become a better CW operator, we welcome you to the CW Academy. Just sign up here and we'll contact you, shortly.

Frank van Wensveen, PA3GMP/ZS6TMV, has a nice website where under title 'Everything but the kitchen sink' published a lot of stuff interesting mainly to computer freaks but not only to them. "A personal, lengthy, but highly articulate outburst" titled 'Why I hate Microsoft' is full of less known facts. Read, look, get inspired and try to verify some facts published here, you will be probably surprised!

Cornwall GKEarlier this year, representatives of some radio amateurs in Cornwall, UK approached Ofcom (The UK government dept regulating the radio spectrum) to request temporary use of the Regional Secondary Locator “K” for Kernow, the Cornish word for Cornwall, following the recognition of the Cornish People under the Framework Convention on National Minorities. Ofcom has agreed to this request and will permit amateurs with a main station address in Cornwall use of the RSL “K” throughout 2016. An example may be GK0XXX or MK0ABC.

Although the operation on the 60 m band in OK still requires a special license, the number of applicants is now unlimited (in 2014 was the number of licenses limited to 10!).